Please Welcome Author Shannon A. Thompson to My Blog Tonight

I asked Shannon to answer four questions for us and here’s what she had to say:

What are you currently working on?

I’m currently working on the content edit for Death Before Daylight, book 3 of The Timely Death Trilogy. AEC Stellar Publishing, Inc. is expecting to release the final installment of the award-winning paranormal romance in January of 2015, but I’m also hoping to re-release my very first publication, November Snow, in November of 2015.

How does your work differ from others of its genre?

The Timely Death Trilogy is told from two perspectives – Eric and Jessica – so the trilogy gives a voice to the usually mysterious boy. I (generally) avoid love triangles, but trust me when I say you can still have a tense romance without one. And I create different creatures than the norm. My books won’t have vampires or werewolves. Although I do love a good traditional story like that, I strive to bring new creatures out of the literature depths. The Timely Death Trilogy revolves around shades and lights, creatures that will soon be explained, Take Me Tomorrow exposes a clairvoyant drug, and November Snow shows a world filled with bad bloods.

Why do you write what you do?

I’ve always been passionate about writing, but I started writing stories to cope with my night terrors and nightmares. I know that might sound ridiculous, but mine were very extreme in the sense that they almost looked like visions. Even after I woke up, I could see them. As a child, this made it really difficult to differentiate between reality and my dreams, so my mother taught me to deal with it by writing. When she suddenly died, I knew I wanted to write for the rest of my life, and I knew I wanted to help other writers follow the dream. So I do that now.

How does your writing process work?

I talk about this all of the time – how complicated and different a writing process can be, especially from book to book or author to author. Strangely enough, I generally define my writing process as writing a screenplay first, and then, moving into prose overtime, but I got into more detail on my website here: http://shannonathompson.com/2014/06/26/the-beginning-of-my-writing-process/ 

All about Shannon:

Shannon A. Thompson

Shannon A. Thompson is a 23-year-old author, avid reader, and a habitual chatterbox. She was merely 16 when she was first published, and a lot has happened since then. Thompson’s work has appeared in numerous poetry collections and anthologies, including a Norwegian magazine, and her first installment of The Timely Death Trilogy, Minutes Before Sunset, became Goodreads Book of the Month. The sequel, Seconds Before Sunrise, has released, and AEC Stellar Publishing released her latest novel, Take Me Tomorrow, on July 17, 2014.

She graduated from the University of Kansas with a bachelor’s degree in English with an emphasis on creative writing.

Shannon spends her free time writing, but she loves spending time with her father and brother. She also has one black cat named after her favorite actor, Humphrey Bogart.

Connect with Shannon here:

Shannon has also graciously offered a  free eBook of either Minutes Before Sunset or Take Me Tomorrow for the first three people who reblog this post or share it on their blog. If you share, please post the link in the comments so Shannon can contact you.

Thank you for being with us on my blog tonight Shannon! I wish you all the best!

 

Please Welcome My Amazing Friend Reece Bridger to the Blog Today!

Reece is a fellow Ravenswood Publishing author. We’ve struck up a friendship over our mutual love of writing. Despite our age difference, we have wonderful chats about our passion, proving writing and the dedication to the craft has no bounds.

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Reece Bridger – Author / Fantasist / Professional Dreamer / Voice Actor

Reece Bridger

I gave Reece four questions to answer:

What are you working on?

The story I’m working on right now is the Buan Trilogy, the first segment of a saga made up of fourteen books or more in total. The first of the trilogy, soon to be re-released with Ravenswood Publishing, is ‘The Perfect Mortals’. The story, which was originally self-published in early 2013, revolves around a family of four siblings living sequestered in the middle of a war-torn, monster-riddled continent. The bloody memories of their past haunt them in the present, and promises to form greater challenges for the future. But, their future takes a drastic turn when they are chosen without any foreseeable reason by their Goddess to be endowed with fantastic and powerful gifts to combat the return of an age-old enemy to the nation. The trilogy focuses on them as they fight against monsters, foreign enemies and their own shortcomings to reach the true cause of their suffering and defeat it once and for all.

How does your work differ from others of its genre?

I believe my first book differs from others of its genre because, despite being filled with arguable clichés and reused common ideas, the main characters have their personal issues to deal with associated with growing up and facing a harsh world that they aren’t prepared for. It explores the effects of unwanted power and responsibility, with no one around to help them. In some ways, it’s a coming-of-age story, but those elements are by no means the main focus; the story takes much more precedence than the characters’ adolescent struggles.

How does your writing process work?

My writing process is somewhat lax in comparison to more renowned and well-experienced authors. Being a full-time student has limited the time I can spare to write. But, that being said, I have managed to get at least 1,000 words in most days when I don’t have other things to worry about. During the summer holidays I always try to write 5,000 words on any day where I don’t have plans, whether those words are spent writing my next book, editing the current ones, or writing the script for my upcoming web series ‘Zoolaplex’. I try to progress by around 5,000 words total through at least one medium per day. As long as I have enough to drink, some good music in the background, and a clear plan of what I want to happen in my head, then it all just seems to write itself most of the time.

Why do you write what you do?

I suppose the reason I write what I write is because I love the story and I want to share it with the world. The story acts as a premise for the rest of the saga and, even with all the plot twists that I’m putting into Buan, I can say without a shadow of a doubt that the rest takes it up a notch. Furthermore, I want to prove that my Aspergers doesn’t hold me back from achieving my dreams; I’ve been told too many times in the past that my condition will limit my opportunities and keep me from having the same standard of life as ‘normal’ people in the future. I want to prove to everyone who shares my condition or has a similar one that what those people say isn’t true. You can still achieve your dreams no matter what stands in your way.

The Perfect Immortals

To follow Reece on his journey:

 

Interviewing Your Characters is a Fun Way to Create Interest in Your Books

If you’re anything like me, your characters mean a lot to you and except for not actually living and breathing in the real world, they are as real as fictional beings can get…to you and your readers.

Even if you are just beginning to mold and shape your characters, asking them questions may help you find out things about them you hadn’t even imagined yet.

I was searching around tonight for interesting ways to attract readers to my books and I found a few interesting articles on creating or borrowing questionnaires you can use to interview the characters in your books.

You don’t want to give too much away in these questionnaires, so you’ll have to pick and choose questions that your sometimes wayward characters won’t answer with spoilers or be forced to answer,  “no comment.”

Here is an interesting list I found. It was out there for public consumption so have at it and by all means, have fun with it! 

This questionnaire was invented by the noted French author Marcel Proust.  These questions are frequently used in interviews so you may pretend you’re interviewing your characters. 
  • What do you consider your greatest achievement?
  • What is your idea of perfect happiness?
  • What is your current state of mind?
  • What is your favorite occupation?
  • What is your most treasured possession?
  • What or who is the greatest love of your life?
  • What is your favorite journey?
  • What is your most marked characteristic?
  • When and where were you the happiest?
  • What is it that you most dislike?
  • What is your greatest fear?
  • What is your greatest extravagance?
  • Which living person do you most despise?
  • What is your greatest regret?
  • Which talent would you most like to have?
  • Where would you like to live?
  • What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?
  • What is the quality you most like in a man?
  • What is the quality you most like in a woman?
  • What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
  • What is the trait you most deplore in others?
  • What do you most value in your friends?
  • Who is your favorite hero of fiction?
  • Whose are your heroes in real life?
  • Which living person do you most admire?
  • What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
  • On what occasions do you lie?
  • Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
  • If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
  • What are your favorite names?
  • How would you like to die?
  • If you were to die and come back as a person or thing, what do you think it would be?
  • What is your motto?